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Bei Linda Tang is a mother and the owner/creative director of an established natural bedding business in Vancouver, Canada. She was born in China and moved to the U.S. when she was a teenager. As a child, she was drawn to art but pursued a career in finance and business favoured by her parents. She struggled with workaholism and depression as a new mother until she became interested in the science and psychology of dreams and worked with her most memorable dreams to resolve her childhood traumas and attain mental balance. In 2020, she experienced a spiritual awakening through two dreams and a real-life encounter with an octopus. These experiences have propelled her to create a holistic dream therapy practice to help people release stress, regulate emotions, and improve mental health. With breathwork and visualization, she guides people into a lucid underwater dream to swim with her octopus friend and experience serene relaxation. Her new practice gives her purpose and profound solace.

 
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Linda's Dreams

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive suffering and uncertainties. It has forced unprecedented changes in every community, family, and individual's life. Like many working mothers, Linda's life was inundated with disruptions and overloaded with stress.
At the start of the pandemic, Linda's left shoulder started to hurt for no apparent reason. There was no strain or injury, and nothing showed up on the x-ray and ultrasound.  Her shoulder pain worsened whenever new stress appeared and became chronic over time to the point she couldn't pull up a shirt over her head and had difficulties sleeping at night. She was reluctant to take medications for a chronic condition because she didn't want to become addicted to substances like many are nowadays. She stayed active and tried various forms of body treatments extensively, including physio, chiro, massage, and acupuncture; however, nothing worked. After over six months of trying, she finally booked a hypnotherapy session for pain relief. While in hypnosis, she had a lucid dream.  
"In this dream, I fell asleep on a big comfortable bed on my left side, and an octopus-like creature fell out of my left shoulder into a body of water. As it sank to the bottom, it jetted upwards to the surface of the water, where there was light. A spirit guide then came to me and told me that my left shoulder pain is a doorway to healing energy and that my new soul's mission is to heal the world with dreams."
Although this dream felt extremely real, she didn't know what to do with it. Coincidentally, not long after, she had a real-life encounter with a giant pacific octopus. Linda lives near Howe Sound in North West Pacific. On the weekends, her family traps spotted prawns for fun and fresh seafood. They set the prawn traps below over 300 feet of seawater. 
"This particular time, just a couple of weeks after my octopus dream, as our first prawn trap came up to the surface of the water, there was a huge octopus riding on top of it. I had never seen an octopus that huge. Its head was bigger than a basketball, and the arms were over 6 feet long. I didn't get a photo of it because it let go and disappeared into the deep water just before I took out the camera."
That trap was much emptier than the other one they pulled up later. The Octopus was inside of it feasting on the prawns - one of its favourite food. When the trap moved up, it had to squeeze through a small hole to make a quick escape. Instead of dwelling on its delicious lunch or getting angry for the disturbance, it chose to let go and avoided the ultimate doom of getting caught. Linda began to wonder if there was a connection between her octopus dream and this encounter, so she booked a follow-up hypnotherapy session, during which she had a second lucid dream.  
"This time, I went into the deep water, and the Octopus swam out of me. It circled me slowly and expanded and shapeshifted into a giant jelly bubble. I went into the jelly bubble and my energy body melted as if I was inside a lava lamp." 
Linda's shoulder pain has subsided since her second Octopus dream. When she feels stressed about something, she revisits the serene dream imageries in her mind and releases the emotions like the Octopus let go of the trap. Working with breathwork and visualization drawn from different traditions, she has guided many people into the dream lucidly. Consistently, people have reported relaxation levels never felt before, deep, restful sleep, and inner balance.  One of her participants is an Emergence Room doctor who practiced dream therapy with her while on call. He was very stressed as most health care professionals are during the pandemic and was experiencing headaches, tightness in his neck, and poor sleep. After the session, however, he slept like a baby for 11 hours straight and woke up feeling restored and recharged for new challenges.
Although restful sleep is the immediate benefit, dream therapy practice is primarily about improving one's mental health. Linda appreciates anyone who takes the time to tend to their mental well-being because it benefits everyone around them. Through mass and social media, we are more connected mentally than ever before, and each person's mental well-being affects everyone else. Linda dedicates her dream therapy work to help people regulate emotions in the face of stress triggers and transform obstacles into learning opportunities. Her vision is simple, help people heal their inner selves through dreaming practice and live happier, more peaceful lives.

 

Octopuses can adapt to changes with ease because they are master shapeshifters. They can also change colour instantly, even while sleeping.

Nature on PBS, Sep 23, 2019